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Category Archives: For Parents

How To Take Action In Your Child’s School

Call your child’s school and ask what provisions are made for school dating abuse policies. Recommended provisions could include:

  • A statement that dating abuse and sexual assault will not be tolerated by the school.
  • The designation of a staff member as “Dating Abuse Coordinator” and the notification to students, parents, and teachers that this individual handles all complaints and requests relating to dating abuse.
  • Creation of in-school stay-away orders that require the abuser to maintain a certain distance from the target of the abuse at all times, and require the abuser to refrain from contacting the target. The school should also create reporting and enforcement procedures and disciplinary measures for violations of stay-away orders.

Love Is Not Abuse Creates New iPhone App for Parents

A new iPhone application has been introduced by Liz Claiborne Inc. Love Is Not Abuse and it’s now available for download in the iTunes App Store!

The new iPhone app is designed to teach parents – in a very real way – about the dangers of teen dating abuse and provides a dramatic demonstration of how technology can be used to commit abuse. Over the course of the experience, text messages, emails and phone calls are received real-time, mimicking the controlling, abusive behaviors teens might face in their relationships.

New study shows dating abuse prevention programs are effective in NYC middle schools

A scientific study on the effectiveness of dating violence prevention programs was conducted in 30 New York City middle schools, involving over 2,500 students. Of these students, 20% identified as having been in an abusive dating relationship. The study, Shifting Boundaries: Final Report on an Experimental Evaluation of a Youth Dating Violence Prevention Program in New York City Middle Schools was funded by the National Institute of Justice and the Office of Safe and Drug-free Schools, US Department of Education.

Why Does She Stay?

She stays because she loves him.

She stays because she believes he needs help, and she can help him.

She stays because she believes things will get better. They don’t.

She stays because she doesn’t know how to leave.